Inter-individual relationships

A search on the term led me to a paper stemming from the Neuro- and Bioinformatics field (gradschool.uni-luebeck.de ).  The work of Thomas Martinetz and team utilized “mental models” of how our brains accurately predict changes in context of how we relate our intentions, emotions, and goals to others.  I don’t see “empathy” mentioned, but it’s my thinking that empathy is the dynamic the researchers are noticing when the subject’s brain regions reveal a “high similarity in emotional experience” and a “similarity in activation patterns”.  The researchers observed this using a MRI technique called ‘pseudo hyperscanning’ on their subjects.  The first subject was being video recorded while scanned and questioned and then later the second subject watched the video while under the impression it was live.

It appears that Hebb’s rule of “Neurons that fire together wire together” could also apply to asynchronous exchanges.  This has me questioning if a network of individuals could use consumer brain–computer interfaces both as a controller and monitor to gauge their collective ‘creative coherence’.  We might also investigate if brain waves in any way correlate with the Earth’s magnetic field. The notion hasn’t been fully explored, but Dr. Buryl Payne appears to have scratched the surface.

Inter-individual relationships

Google Is Like a ‘Mental Prosthetic’

Research suggests we’re less likely to memorize much from the “influx of information,” simply because it’s so readily available online.

“Thinking with computers is a natural extension of that. In the same way you depend on a friend, now you depend on Google,” Daniel Wegner at Harvard, told TechNewsWorld.

Instead, the brain will more often remember where the information can be retrieved, rather than what the information actually is.

“We’re a lot smarter now, and that’s why we use it. We’ve become somewhat addicted because it really extends mental capacities. It’s kind of like a mental prosthetic device that’s better than what you’ve had before,” Wegner said.

According to Paul Reber, professor and director of brain, behavior and cognition at Northwestern University, our brain is wisely strategizing.

“There’s no evidence we are forgetting things more rapidly now than before the Internet. It seems likely that with a much larger amount of information generally around, we are probably trying to remember more. In addition to studying what we forget, it would be important to look at how much we remember,” Reber said.

 

Google Is Like a ‘Mental Prosthetic’

Swarm Creativity Framework

Business sustainability and collective intelligence

clipped via emeraldinsight.com

Research in the natural and social sciences has shown this conception to be too narrow. Intelligence is a property of collectives. For the purposes of this paper, one takes a collective to be some entity distinguished as being non-atomic. Ant colonies, swarms, flocks or herds are examples among the non-human animals. Collectives of people may exhibit superior problem-solving capabilities than any of their most intelligent members. Even individual intelligence may be conceived as the intelligence of the collective of neurons that constitute one person’s brain.

Author(s): Paulo Garrido, (School of Engineering, Algoritmi Centre and Industrial Electronics Department, University of Minho, Guimarães, Portugal)
Citation: Paulo Garrido, (2009) “Business sustainability and collective intelligence”, Learning Organization, The, Vol. 16 Iss: 3, pp.208 – 222
Keywords: Business enterpriseOrganizational theorySustainable development

Creativity is the primary asset in this framework.

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Swarm Creativity Framework

Epic Pain

Pain is a difficult thing to think about.  Nobody really wants to.  We just want to forget about it.  Yet, we are fascinated by pain.  It strikes a chord within us and we so often find ourselves putting on the brakes to catch a glimpse of it while passing a car accident.  We wonder, “Is anybody hurt?”

Pain is linked to everything that is “wrong” in our lives.  We try to avoid it, yet it always creeps in.  We hate it the most when it presents itself for no reason at all.  It is not fair.

Pain is an uninvited guest.  It enters our bodies and pesters us.  It pokes, prods, and sometimes goes so far as to push us down on the ground.  Why?  We scream for it to get out, but it comes back relentlessly.  What does it want?

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Epic Pain