Remembering Revolutionary Media

The movement in Egypt was said to be “very dependent on Facebook,” according to an Egyptian blogger and activist Alaa Abd El Fattah who was quoted in the Washington Post. Fueled by the anger over high food prices and high unemployment, the citizen’s communications strategy went beyond social media.

Collective Intelligence expert, Don Tapscott, wrote in HuffPo about Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak’s attempt to maintain a “firm grip” on the country’s media, which was ultimately lost due to the “interactive and decentralized” power of the web.

ReadWriteWeb noted that even when 90% of Egyptian internet access points were shut down by major ISPs, the coordination of “old-style” dial up connections helped maintain communications throughout the country.

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Remembering Revolutionary Media

Epic Pain

Pain is a difficult thing to think about.  Nobody really wants to.  We just want to forget about it.  Yet, we are fascinated by pain.  It strikes a chord within us and we so often find ourselves putting on the brakes to catch a glimpse of it while passing a car accident.  We wonder, “Is anybody hurt?”

Pain is linked to everything that is “wrong” in our lives.  We try to avoid it, yet it always creeps in.  We hate it the most when it presents itself for no reason at all.  It is not fair.

Pain is an uninvited guest.  It enters our bodies and pesters us.  It pokes, prods, and sometimes goes so far as to push us down on the ground.  Why?  We scream for it to get out, but it comes back relentlessly.  What does it want?

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Epic Pain

Slow Down & Make Tech Meaningful!

It is late.  I woke up thinking about how technology makes things so convenient and how we steadily input more and more of it into our lives.   A certain amount of convenience is nice but when everything is micro-packaged we think it means we should consume more of it.  We eat more fast food because it steals less time from our day that we could be spending with our child.  We “scan” RSS and twitter feeds while sipping on a 40 oz. diet coke.  We get frustrated when there is no wi-fi in a building because we need to check our e-mail, now!  The way we consume is hyper-accelerated.  We get stressed out.  We get sick.

This is not happening everywhere in the world.  This blog hopes to examine how other cultures incorporate technology into their already existent value systems.  I hope that we will learn the value in slowing down.  I already wrote about the “slow family,” which I believe is a good place to begin a more conscious lifestyle with less stress.  The world – out there – will take some time to slow down, but you can begin to become aware of the subtleties, flavors, and joys of taking it a notch down, while at home.

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Slow Down & Make Tech Meaningful!

The slow family

The Wood family, December 1970
The Wood family, December 1970 (Photo credit: Dave Traynor)

“Family” is a powerful word.  It carries much more weight than “community” and certainly more weight than “culture.”

In this blog I explore a concept I call the “slow family”.  This idea stems from the slow movement.

Most, post-modern families have subjective values, undefined roles, and their lifestyles tend to be more concerned with extrinsic motivation rather than intrinsic motivation. They celebrate each others materialistic achievements because they matter the most.   Extrinsic  motivation is about fulfilling tangible cravings and rewards.  Intrinsic motivation is more concerned with personal development, demonstrating personality in ways both creative and productive. We all know that young children are highly suggestible.  They are also highly insatiable.

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The slow family