The bubble magic of virtual reality

bubbles
Bubbles By Arturo Alejandro Romo Escartin

My son’s eyes light up in anticipation when I open the bottle of soapy water. It’s ¬†magic time. As the bubbles float slowly down, he giggles and dances with glee, popping all the bubbles within his reach.

For Shiloh, bubbles are some kind of magic.  He has no sense of the scientific concepts that underly bubbles: the surface tension, elasticity, chemistry, light, or even the geometric description of spherical surface area: sphere area!

Maybe you get that ‘bubble feeling’ when you get your hands on a new gadget. I’m a bit of a geek, so I flipped out when I tried virtual reality through Google Cardboard for the first time. (Check out the first video I viewed in VR by Vrse.)

The spectacle of a new sphere of experience surrounded my eyes. I recall that famous quote by Arthur C. Clarke:

“Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.”

Like a bubble being blown for my son, the spectacle of a whole new sphere of reality surrounded my eyes. And that app and simple box that wrapped around my iPhone made it possible. Bubbly magic!

Few of us can explain the science of modern machines. The phantasmal magic of tech is becoming ever more complex. While we know how to describe the surface of our user experience, how the magic actually happens, is becoming less and less explainable.

Expect VR to make the mundane a whole lot more fun. That’s my 2¬Ę on virtual reality.

The bubble magic of virtual reality

The slow family

The Wood family, December 1970
The Wood family, December 1970 (Photo credit: Dave Traynor)

“Family” is a powerful word.¬† It carries much more weight than “community” and certainly more weight than “culture.”

In this blog I explore a concept I call the “slow family”. ¬†This idea stems from the¬†slow movement.

Most, post-modern families have subjective values, undefined roles, and their lifestyles tend to be more concerned with extrinsic motivation rather than intrinsic motivation. They celebrate each others materialistic achievements because they matter the most.   Extrinsic  motivation is about fulfilling tangible cravings and rewards.  Intrinsic motivation is more concerned with personal development, demonstrating personality in ways both creative and productive. We all know that young children are highly suggestible.  They are also highly insatiable.

Continue reading “The slow family”

The slow family